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Mija Is Proof That Anything Is Possible

Mija Is Proof That Anything Is Possible

mija disney+

Back in July, was the first time we talked about Mija, the Disney Original Documentary about first-generation Americans Doris Muñoz and Jacks Haupt. Now, after its run in theaters, the movie is finally on Disney+ for us all, and we’re here to tell you all the reasons why you should watch it. Shall we get started?

The “Characters”

The movie’s protagonists really steal the show! Jacks and Doris have very different but also similar stories. Both are the first daughters of Mexican immigrants to be born in the US, and that comes with consequences. There are a lot of expectations put on their shoulders to honor the sacrifices their parents made, but also their own hopes and dreams to take into consideration.

We inherit our family’s dreams, but also their fears

– Doris Muñoz

When Doris says that in the documentary, we’re seeing her at her most vulnerable. Her brother has been deported, she doesn’t know if her parents will get green cards and she’s just lost the biggest artist she was managing. She’s 100% considering a career in the music industry may not be for her. But all that changes when she meets another Latina.

We’re, of course, talking about Jacks Haupt. Jacks came up on Doris’ radar via social media and relit a fire and a passion for talent managing. An unlikely partnership (at least based on geographical factors) forms and they bond throughout the movie. Starting with the fact that they both know what it feels like to have parents constantly doubting their career choices.

Both women choose to follow careers in the music industry. Doris as a talent manager, and Jacks as a singer. Both of them face challenges and moments where it seems easier to quit and go for something “safer,” but that wouldn’t be fair to their own selves. These two love their jobs too much. We think that may be part of the reason we liked them right away. After all, it’s nearly impossible for us to not like people working and making a difference in this industry.

The Realness

Yes, this is a Disney production, but it is still a documentary. And as such, it doesn’t shy away from hard topics and moments. A great example is how it handles Doris’ brother being deported. That fact is central to her life for the last six years. Jose being back in Mexico is a constant reminder that she was the first one in the family born in the States, the only one who has the “right” documentation. That also makes her the only one who can go to Tijuana to visit Jose for over half a decade.

On the other side of the movie, we also see Jacks struggling to convince her parents that music can be a full-time job. This is the topic of many of her conversations during the movie, but it hits especially hard when they show us a conversation between Jacks and her parents on the phone. She’s been in California for a while working on her EP and when she tells her parents about it, they’re not as hyped as she’d hoped. In fact, they only seem concerned about when she’ll start to make money.

Both of these girls have their issues, but that never stops them. They keep moving forward and trying to be better. And we see it work out in the end, too. Jacks’ career is going well and Doris’ hard work to get her parents’ green cards paid off and they finally got to see their son after so long away.

The Aesthetic

Whoever decided to blend the images captured for the documentary with home videos, we love you! It works so well with the tone of the movie we can’t imagine it any other way. Even the moments where the home videos appear are perfect! They bring us closer to the girls and their history since the families came to the US.

Most of all, these videos show us what was so important to the families they felt the need to film it. Doris’ birth in the US, birthday parties, Jacks’ first time in California. These are all special moments that deserved to be watched from the perspective of the individuals involved.

And while we’re talking about things we loved in the movie, let’s talk about how so much of it is in Spanish. Or a mix of Spanish and English. Here’s the thing: immigrants and their children don’t speak only one language at home. And we see that very clearly with the conversations happening all over Mija. Doris speaks Spanish with her parents all the time, and Jacks switches between Spanish and English mid-sentence more than once. That’s natural and beautiful to watch.

See Also

Image Source: Courtesy of Disney

The Message Of Hope

It’s no secret that Mija highlights some struggles of being the child of immigrants, but it also sends a very clear message about it: there is always hope. Times can get tough, but the light always comes back. We admit we cried watching Doris’ parents meet Jose again because it was such a beautiful family moment!

Another moment that brought tears to our eyes was when we saw Jacks starting to work on her music in California. She’s been fighting for it for so long! And now she gets to do what she loves. Yes, there’s still a long road ahead, but the journey has started and that’s already great.

At the end of the day, Mija brings us that warm, fuzzy feeling we love so much. It’s a reminder that while some days may appear sad and hopeless, there’s actually always something good waiting to happen. We just need to give it another try, just like Jacks and Doris did.

And we’ve reached the end of our little Mija review. We hope you’ve enjoyed it and that you check out the movie on Disney+ as well. And please come talk to us after you watch it! We always love to hear from you, whether it’s on Twitter, Instagram, or Facebook. We’ll be waiting!

What’s that? Want more TV & Movies content? Here you go, honey! We gotchu, don’t worry.

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